Well-Being

Parent voice across the system resulted in the following ranking of what we as a school board do best:   

Equity and Inclusivity

3.5
out of a possible 4 point ranking.

Update on Well-Being in ADSB

Algoma District School Board is focused on four key areas in our Well-Being Strategy:

  1. Equity & Inclusive Education
  2. Safe & Accepting Schools
  3. Positive Mental Health
  4. Healthy Schools

Supporting Our Students

Our Mental Health Lead, Darryl Fillmore, has completed 42 transition meetings with students and their families transitioning from Sault Area Hospital (SAH) back to their school. He has completed 54 transition meetings with students who are transitioning back to school from other hospitals and/or for other mental health reasons.

Separate from his SAH referrals, Darryl completes Mental Health Consultations with schools and families. He has completed 108 Mental Health Consults this year and suggests that the majority of these have anxiety presentations and often struggle with multiple co-morbid mental health challenges in addition to anxiety.

Mental Health Lead has transitioned

96 students
back to their respective schools following stays in Sault Area Hospital or other hospitals for a variety of mental health reasons.

Behaviour Management Systems

Behaviour Management Systems (BMS) is a course developed to ensure a respectful learning environment at school. It provides training and support systems for enhancing desirable behaviour and for understanding, preventing and coping with undesirable behaviour.

Student Senate Focuses on Well-Being

The fourth annual Bon Soo Olympics was hosted by ADSB Student Senate in February. This annual event began as a Project ABCD initiative (Action for Building A Community that is Drug-Free). Students who were part of Project ABCD stressed how important it was not to be told “don’t do drugs” but to provide healthy alternatives to obtaining natural highs.

ADSB Parent Involvement Committee

Our Parent Involvement Committee (PIC) took the lead on an initiative in November encouraging families to “Power Down and Play.” They challenged families to turn off their electronic devices, reduce screen time and spend some family time engaged in activities that supported physical literacy and skill development. Families were invited to submit photos and videos of parents and children playing games, going for walks and taking part in various physical activities. Names were entered, and the winning family received four tickets to a Soo Greyhounds hockey game. Dozens of photo entries were received showing children and teens chopping wood, sewing cushions, skating, hiking in the woods, playing cards, making snow angels, baking and cooking, raking and playing in the leaves. PIC is looking forward to promoting the message of healthy, active living and may do other contests in the future to engage ADSB families.